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http://athomecolorado.comBoulder, Erie, Lafayette, Longmont, Louisville, Loveland, Superior Real Estate
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http://athomecolorado.com/?p=13107
Louisville restaurateur buys again in North End Three years ago Emilio Ruggiero, owner of Parma Trattoria & Mozzarella Bar in Louisville, saw a sign for North End on his drive into work. He stopped by the sales center and picked up a flier. Five months later, with his place in Boulder sold, Ruggiero moved into […]

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Markel Homes, North End

Tour the town home model located at 1459 Hecla Way, Louisville, this Sunday, Jan. 7th, from 1 to 3 p.m.

Louisville restaurateur buys again in North End

Three years ago Emilio Ruggiero, owner of Parma Trattoria & Mozzarella Bar in Louisville, saw a sign for North End on his drive into work. He stopped by the sales center and picked up a flier. Five months later, with his place in Boulder sold, Ruggiero moved into a two-story home on White Violet Way. Last month, two weeks before Christmas, Ruggiero closed on his second North End property, this time a tri-level town home. “Markel always gives me a modern look that I like,” says Ruggiero. “Markel has consistency. I like the overall style, I like that each house is different, and I love the windows.”

Single family to town home
When construction started on the town homes last summer, Ruggiero went to Michele Steward, North End Sales Manager, and asked to see the project. “I was ready to downsize,” Ruggiero recalls, “so the town homes appealed to me. Now that I’m in, I like that the kitchen and living room share the middle floor. It’s cozy. The decks are awesome. The skylights are awesome. I like the two colors of cabinets in the kitchen and the big, south-facing window in the bedroom (and in the great room).”

Markel Homes, North End

Entertain friends or answer e-mails at the
kitchen island with seating for three.

Open and bright kitchen and living area
The kitchen and great room are on the second level, with large decks at either end. Ruggiero has plans for a grill on the deck off the kitchen. “It’ll be fun,” he says. “We’ll put outdoor seats and a table on the deck off the living room. There’s a lot of deck space with the town homes. I like that.” The third floor houses the master suite, two more bedrooms and a bath.
“I thought my (17-year-old) son might want that first floor space, but he really likes his bedroom on the top floor.”

Unique flex space on main floor
The town home floor plan features something new from Markel Homes – a flex space at street level, with its own entrance, large south-facing window, front courtyard and bath. “The lower level is cool,” says Ruggiero. “You can close the door and lock it and have someone in there, or use it as a studio or home office. The space has its own feel.” A home office or studio comes to mind, or rental income for a space that’s private and separate from the rest of the home. The two-car garage is located on the main floor, behind the flex space.

Falcon homes available now in Block 10
Six Falcons, one of Markel’s most popular two-story designs, are under construction on Snowberry Lane in Block 10, close to downtown Louisville and the shops and services on 95th Street. Open living, dining and kitchen areas, duo-tone cabinetry, stainless steel and solid surface finishes, and natural maple hardwoods give the Falcons their contemporary tone and inviting look and feel. The upper level features a vaulted master suite with five-piece bath and walk-in closet, two more bedrooms and a second bath and laundry room. The unfinished lower level includes rough-in plumbing for future expansion as a rec room, fourth bedroom and third full bath. The detached two-car garage and outdoor living area are to the rear of the home. The walking path through open space and around Hecla Lake is just up the street from Snowberry Lane. Waneka Lake and other popular destinations are easily accessible from Block 10 via the area’s trail network. Two Falcons will be move-in ready later this month, with pricing from $769,900. The other four will be ready throughout the winter and into spring.

Variety of home types available
Only three town homes are left in the six-plex on Hecla Way. All three are interior units with master and mini-master suites and the unique main-floor flex space for $624,900. The model town home at 1459 Hecla Way will be open for touring this Sunday, January 7th, from 1 to 3 p.m. A two-story duplex is under construction, with completion scheduled for March. At $639,900, the duplex unit features beautiful natural light in an open interior, modern finishes, three bedrooms, outdoor living and an attached two-car garage plus an optional lower level finish. For the condo buyer, the time to act is now. Only four condo lofts are left in the
12-plex breaking ground this month in Block 10, with pricing from $430,500.

Louisville attracts business owners
Born and raised in Rome, Ruggiero says he really likes the Louisville area. “I don’t see myself living in Boulder again. Every year more businesses are coming to Louisville. My business partner is from Naples. He takes care of the kitchen, I take care of the front of the house. Together we know how to run a restaurant.”

The year 2017 was good to Emilio Ruggiero. He sold one home for a profit and bought a second in a community he loves, in the city where his business is located. His restaurant won the Daily Camera’s Gold Award earlier this year and, just days before our interview, Parma was named Best Business of the Year by the Louisville Chamber of Commerce. Ruggiero will receive the award on January 24th, exactly six years after opening Parma’s doors.

Sales Center open daily
The North End Sales Center is located at 1805 Blue Star Lane in Louisville. They’re open daily from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Tuesdays 2 to 5 p.m.). Contact Sales Manager Michele Steward at 303.604.9196 or send an e-mail to michele@markelhomes.com. For more information about the homes at North End and in the Markel Homes communities throughout Boulder County, visit the company’s website at www.markelhomes.com.

By Rebecca Lee, Photography by Markel Homes

Markel Homes, North End

(Left) Ruggiero enjoys running around Hecla Lake in the spring and summer. “I like that there’s water in the neighborhood.” (Center) Emilio Ruggiero, owner of Parma Trattoria & Mozzarella Bar in Louisville, purchased his second home in North End in December. (Right) The master and mini-master suites occupy the upper level of the town homes, with a large south-facing window in the master bedroom.

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http://athomecolorado.com/hobbies-diy-notebook-will-help-stick-resolutions/http://athomecolorado.com/hobbies-diy-notebook-will-help-stick-resolutions/#respondFri, 05 Jan 2018 18:01:27 +0000






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It is a new year, and that usually means a list of resolutions. I don’t normally write them down, but I admit to starting each new year with a determination to get more organized. And while I use my phone for schedules and reminders, the thing that helps me most are notebooks. I’m not talking […]

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DIY Notebook

The beauty of a DIY notebook is how perfectly it can suit your needs. (Photo: Cara Mariano)

It is a new year, and that usually means a list of resolutions. I don’t normally write them down, but I admit to starting each new year with a determination to get more organized. And while I use my phone for schedules and reminders, the thing that helps me most are notebooks.

I’m not talking about large three-ring binders, but mini-books that easily fit in a purse or pocket. I know I’m not alone because I see planners everywhere, but what I just discovered is how easy it is to make your own.

The beauty of a DIY notebook is how perfectly it can suit your needs. The size of the book, how many pages and how to decorate the cover are all up to you. One book can be devoted entirely to house issues, or work or carpools…it’s totally your decision.

To make a notebook, cut copy or notebook paper (if you want lined pages) to the desired size. The pages will be folded in half so double the length. Create a folded cover out of cardstock in the same size and embellish it as little or as much as you like.

The tricky part of making a notebook is the binding. If your book will hold a lot of pages, you can punch holes in the pages and secure them with colored rings (available at any office supply store) or plastic bird leg bands. But books with smaller page counts are bounad simply with staples. And if you don’t own a long neck stapler (who does?), you need only open up the stapler so it is flat and staple into the folded seam of the cover and all of the pages with a scrap of cardboard underneath. Separate the pages from the cardboard by pulling them up in one clump and the prongs of the staples will be facing up. A pencil eraser is the perfect tool to push the ends of the staples closed, and your book is now bound. If the exposed staples in the cover are an issue, simply fold a strip of patterned paper, the same width of the book, and fasten it over the stapled seam.

For the closure, I sometimes fasten a button with a dot of foam adhesive to the cover and a ribbon to hold the book closed. Other times I slide on an oversized, colored rubber band. But most often I don’t worry about adding a closure because the stapled books are so flat it’s not really necessary.

So if you are trying to juggle multiple tasks and need a little help, you might consider a notebook or two (or three). They are quick and easy to make and will become valued tools to keep you organized. You can plan on it.

By Sandi Genovese, Tribune News ServiceContact Sandi and find free video demonstrations of more photo projects at sandigenovese.com.

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http://athomecolorado.com/style-home-tell-story-trays/http://athomecolorado.com/style-home-tell-story-trays/#respondFri, 05 Jan 2018 17:56:54 +0000



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At its heart, good design is all about telling our stories. My favorite spaces are those that wrap me up in the world of the people who live there. The furniture and accents we select for our homes work together to give glimpses of who we are and what we hold dear. Trays are the […]

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Home Decor, Trays

Trays not only make everything that sits upon them feel special, they are also attractive workhorses, beautifully corralling all our stuff. (Photo: Mary Carol Garrity/TNS)

At its heart, good design is all about telling our stories. My favorite spaces are those that wrap me up in the world of the people who live there. The furniture and accents we select for our homes work together to give glimpses of who we are and what we hold dear.

Trays are the ultimate tools for telling your stories in your home. I view trays filled with tableaux as artwork, simple stages on which the one-act plays of our lives come alive. You will find them in just about every room of my cottage, holding things that are precious, like family heirlooms, and everyday, like our TV remote and my readers.

The other day I was working with a customer, helping her make her home a better reflection of her style and personality. On our checklist was styling the open hutch in her dining room and creating a display on her living room coffee table. She had lovely accents, but what she was missing was a good selection of trays.
We fixed that!

To make her hutch less staged or fussy feeling, we used trays to help it tell a series of interesting stories. For example, we placed a tray on a shelf and filled it with bottles of after-dinner drinks and glasses. It made her hutch not only functional, but also visually appealing. I used a tray in a similar way to house tea cups in the bookcases that line my dining room walls.

Since our cottage is so small, we have to use just about every inch when we entertain. Trays are an essential when we take the party to the living room, den or outside. I like to keep trays on my end tables, ready to fill with drinks or snacks when friends drop by. To make your drinks service more appealing, poke in an accent.

Home Decor, Trays

(Photo: Mary Carol Garrity/TNS)

Trays not only make everything that sits upon them feel special, they are also attractive workhorses, beautifully corralling all our stuff. For example, in my bathroom, I have a round silver tray on my vanity that holds a glass compote filled with my jewelry and a mug chockfull of makeup brushes. I filled in the empty spaces with little treasures that make me smile, like petite framed photos of my family. Take away the tray, and you’ve got a cluttered mess. Add the tray, and it looks like artwork.

I like to use trays in my kitchen to pull together things like Dan’s cooking utensils, vinegars and oils; the makings for my morning cup of coffee; or dishes and silverware ready to put on the table for dinner. Place one on your office desk to hold pens, paper clips and papers. In your family room, fill a tray with your remote controls, magazines and books. It’s a great place to put your reading glasses so you don’t lose them.

Trays also make fabulous artwork. In bookcases, you can tilt a tray on its side and use it as a backdrop to a display, giving the space added depth.

By Mary Carol Garrity, Tribune News Service. This column was adapted from Mary Carol Garrity’s blog at nellhills.com. She can be reached at marycarol@nellhills.com.

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http://athomecolorado.com/ask-expert-radon-testing/http://athomecolorado.com/ask-expert-radon-testing/#respondFri, 05 Jan 2018 17:48:56 +0000



http://athomecolorado.com/?p=13097
BOULDER – You may remember our column about radon testing from a few months ago. Given that winter is the best time to test your home for radon we decided to run it again. Houses should be sealed with doors and windows closed as much as possible for testing making the colder months ideal for testing. […]

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Rick Jacquemard, Flatirons Home Inspections

Rick Jacquemard, Flatirons Home Inspections

BOULDER – You may remember our column about radon testing from a few months ago. Given that winter is the best time to test your home for radon we decided to run it again. Houses should be sealed with doors and windows closed as much as possible for testing making the colder months ideal for testing.

What is Radon and why should I test for it? Radon is a cancer-causing radioactive gas. You cannot see, smell or taste radon, but it may be a problem in your home. The Surgeon General has warned that indoor radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today after smoking.

It is a common misconception that certain areas of the United States are not at risk for radon. In fact, radon can be found in high levels in every state in the country; it doesn’t discriminate between new or old homes, brick or wood frame, basement or no basement. Testing is the only way to know your home’s radon levels. There are no immediate symptoms that will alert you to the presence of high radon levels. The U.S. EPA, the Surgeon General and the American Lung Association recommend having your home tested. Winter is an ideal time to test your home for radon as doors and window must be kept shut as much as possible during the test period.

Radon testing can be done by the home owner with a one-time use kit that is mailed to a lab for testing. These do it yourself kits can be purchased on line or in your local hardware store. In most cases however, including real estate transactions, homeowners and prospective homeowners prefer the testing be done by a qualified professional.

The EPA recommends mitigation for your home if the test results are 4 pCi/L or higher. Radon mitigation systems can cost between $550 and $2,500 depending on the size of the house and type of construction. Homes with unfinished basements or crawl spaces tend to be toward the lower end of the price range.

One of the most effective methods of reducing radon methods in buildings is soil suction, which involves installing one or more pipes beneath the foundation that vent radon away from the building’s interior. This is often accompanied by the sealing of cracks through which radon can flow into the building.

For more information on home inspections contact Rick Jacquemard, at 720.280.3544, e-mail rick@flatironshi.com or visit flatironshi.com.

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http://athomecolorado.com/ask-angies-list-indoor-air-quality-hazardous-health/http://athomecolorado.com/ask-angies-list-indoor-air-quality-hazardous-health/#respondFri, 05 Jan 2018 17:43:09 +0000





http://athomecolorado.com/?p=13095
We all know that outdoor air pollution can be hazardous to our health, but indoor air quality presents several risks that we should keep top of mind as well. Sources such as heating systems, certain building materials and even nature itself can release harmful gases or particles into the air inside our homes, according to […]

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We all know that outdoor air pollution can be hazardous to our health, but indoor air quality presents several risks that we should keep top of mind as well. Sources such as heating systems, certain building materials and even nature itself can release harmful gases or particles into the air inside our homes, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). And inadequate ventilation can lead to increased concentrations and exposure.

Here’s a look at three common indoor air pollutants and what you can do to avoid unsafe levels in your home:

Carbon Monoxide
Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas. Common sources of carbon monoxide include improperly vented gas appliances, poorly maintained boilers and furnaces, and clogged or leaking chimneys. Carbon monoxide can be fatal at high concentrations. And at lower concentrations, it may cause fatigue, nausea, headaches, impaired vision and reduced brain function, among other symptoms.

To prevent high concentrations of carbon monoxide, it’s important to properly maintain all combustion equipment and ensure proper ventilation. (The EPA recommends having a trained professional inspect chimneys, water heaters, gas furnaces, and gas ranges and ovens annually.) It’s also important to keep a carbon monoxide detector in good working order in your home.

Radon
Radon is a radioactive gas that results from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water. Like carbon monoxide, it is both odorless and colorless. All homes, new and old, are susceptible to radon. The gas typically enters a home by rising up through the soil and seeping into the cracks and crevices of a home’s foundation, but it may also enter the home through wall cracks, construction joints and water supply sources, among other areas. The EPA estimates that one in 15 homes in the United States is affected by high levels of radon.

Exposure to elevated radon levels is known to cause lung cancer and serious respiratory health issues. The best way to ensure that your home is safe is to administer a radon test. You may either hire a qualified testing professional or purchase a home kit to test your home for radon. There are both short- and long-term tests available. The EPA recommends starting with a short-term test. The results of this test will indicate whether you should follow up with another short-term test or a long-term test. The higher the results, the greater the likelihood that you’ll need to hire a radon mitigation specialist to address the problem.

Volatile Organic Compounds
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are emitted as gases from a variety of household paints, disinfectants and solvents, as well as some building materials – including certain carpets and flooring. The health effects of VOC exposure will depend on the level of exposure and the amount of time exposed, but VOCs are known to cause eye, nose and throat irritation; headaches; nausea; damage to the liver, kidney and central nervous system; and, in some cases, even cancer.

To decrease exposure to VOCs in your home, the EPA recommends carefully following label instructions, increasing ventilation when using VOC-emitting products, and safely storing and disposing of unneeded chemicals. Many products offer low-VOC or zero-VOC options; it’s best to choose these whenever possible.

To evaluate your risk for poor indoor air quality, take a survey of your home. Identify where combustion systems are located, inventory how chemicals are stored and assess whether ventilation is adequate. If you’d like further reassurance that your home is safe, contact your local health department for guidance on how to evaluate your home’s air quality with the help of professionals.

By Megan Linhoff, Angie’s ListMegan Linhoff is a reporter for Angie’s List, a trusted provider of local consumer reviews and an online marketplace of services from top-rated providers. Visit AngiesList.com.

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http://athomecolorado.com/goodacre-and-company-father-son-team/http://athomecolorado.com/goodacre-and-company-father-son-team/#respondSat, 23 Dec 2017 00:15:13 +0000





http://athomecolorado.com/?p=13088
Integrity comes first with Ken and Ben Roth. Legendary basketball coach John Wooden once said it isn’t what you do, but how you do it. Ken Roth, managing broker at Boulder real estate firm Goodacre & Company, applies this principle to helpings clients buy and sell their homes. What do you do, he asks, when […]

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Goodacre Real Estate

Working together as a family is classic Goodacre.

Goodacre Real Estate

The high-end homes in this area, and the complexities of such transactions, are Ken and Ben Roth’s bread and butter.

Integrity comes first with Ken and Ben Roth.

Legendary basketball coach John Wooden once said it isn’t what you do, but how you do it.

Ken Roth, managing broker at Boulder real estate firm Goodacre & Company, applies this principle to helpings clients buy and sell their homes. What do you do, he asks, when you’ve spent two months working with someone on purchasing a home, only to see it fall apart? “You don’t push a client too hard toward a sale if they don’t believe it’s in their best interest,” he says. “I treat my clients as if I were the one buying the house.”

That approach has served him well at Goodacre & Company – a Boulder institution since 1975. Working for reputation over revenue sees the firm leading the local market in high-end transactions 42 years after it started.

Roth came into real estate in 2001 after 30 years in manufacturing. In eight weeks, he secured his real estate license and was off to the races. Two years later, he joined Goodacre and has been there ever since. He credits company founder Bill Goodacre’s deep community connections with the company’s longevity and success. “Bill is truly Realtor emeritus,” he says.

The notion that Boulder’s Realtor community is friendly despite the lack of inventory might surprise some. But, Roth explains, that’s not accidental. “We have such good relationships with the other realty offices in town. They all know we’ll hold up our end of the transaction. We help each other out, and that’s different than what you find in some big city markets. Our goal is simple: no drama.”

Ben Roth, Ken’s son, had the real estate bug early on. He got his real estate license at 18, and immediately started working in property management and leasing and, while in college, a showing service. In 2012, Goodacre was retooling its front desk position, looking for someone with both people skills and marketing aptitude. When a great candidate was not coming along, Ken was still somewhat surprised to learn that his own son wanted to give it a shot. “This position is a good fit for me,” Ben says. “I have always been interested in real estate, in houses, in design, and I enjoy the great relationships with clients.”

Five years later, father and son work closely and Ben is preparing to close on his third personal purchase. As a broker associate and marketing guru, he can cover for his dad when he’s out of town and also showcase his marketing and design talents for many of the company’s products.

Working together as a family is classic Goodacre. It’s not something Ken saw coming when he once imagined what he and his sons would do workwise, but that’s what happened. Ken’s son Zach works in manufacturing for Studio Shed in Louisville, and of course Ken himself is a recovering mechanical engineer. They have that connection. With Ben in real estate, Ken passes on his knowledge and work ethic in this industry, too. “It’s very rewarding for me as the managing broker to help move new people along,” Ken says, “and Ben being my son, even more so.”

“I haven’t run him off yet,” Ben chuckles. “It’s been great working with my dad. I have learned a ton from him. His experience is a huge asset to me.”

It’s not all work for the Roth boys, though. That would never work. Ben, a national champion of competitive indoor rock climbing at age 13, got Ken into climbing. They also hit the slopes and hike together. And perhaps the most Boulder thing about them is that they brew beer together. In the garage. In fact, their Belgian double Christmas ale – Bad Santa – is fermenting as you read these words.

Ken can see retirement on the horizon, which in the real estate business doesn’t happen all at once. One slowly steps away. Seeing his son’s passion for real estate and catching glimpses of the integrity he’s tried so hard to pass on, Ken knows he can wind down his business at the right time and everything’s going to be just fine.

But that’s down the road. Today you’ll find this dream team working very hard for their clients. The high-end homes in this area, and the complexities of such transactions, are their bread and butter.

To learn more about how Ken and Ben Roth and Goodacre & Company can assist with your home sale or purchase, simply stop by Goodacre’s office at 2450 Broadway in Boulder or visit goodacreproperties.com. You can reach Ken Roth at 720.201.0941 or by e-mail at ken@goodacreproperties.com; or Ben Roth at 303.956.5713 or by e-mail at ben@goodacreproperties.com.

 

Goodacre Real Estate

8812 Lakeside Court, Boulder (Left Photo)
$1,990,000 – 5 bedroom, 6 bath – 5,614 square feet – www.8812lakeside.com
This stunning Park Lake home in East Boulder County is surrounded by lakes and ponds, and hundreds of acres of City of Boulder Open Space. A gorgeous property of more than one acre, it boasts beautiful, mature landscaping, outdoor living spaces and lake views. Teller Farms Trails are easily accessible for miles of uninterrupted off-road running and biking adventures. Minutes from downtown shopping and dining in Boulder, Lafayette, Louisville, and Erie.

5880 Olde Stage Road, Boulder (Right Photo)
$925,000 – 3 bedroom, 3 bath – 4,078 square feet- www.5880OldeStage.com
What a rare opportunity to own in North Boulder! This is the premiere location on Olde Stage Road, built 55 years ago and rebuilt and modernized in 1991. Peerless views of hundreds of acres of adjacent open space and longer distant views of the plains and lakes. A mere ten minutes from downtown Boulder, but it feels light years away from the bustle of the city.

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http://athomecolorado.com/boulder-county-bustling-gunbarrel/http://athomecolorado.com/boulder-county-bustling-gunbarrel/#respondFri, 22 Dec 2017 21:56:48 +0000






http://athomecolorado.com/?p=13085
BOULDER – What was once sweeping farmland northeast of Boulder is now a bustling hub for businesses, breweries and restaurants. Gunbarrel (cheekily named by those in the know as “Funbarrel”) is one of the fastest growing neighborhoods in Boulder County. Named after a historic stagecoach route, Gunbarrel is often thought of as the little town […]

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Gunbarrel, Boulder County, Colorado

Gunbarrel is one of the fastest growing neighborhoods in Boulder County. (Photo: Laura Hobbs)

Sean McIllwain, Mod Boulder Real Estate

Sean McIllwain, Mod Boulder Real Estate

BOULDER – What was once sweeping farmland northeast of Boulder is now a bustling hub for businesses, breweries and restaurants. Gunbarrel (cheekily named by those in the know as “Funbarrel”) is one of the fastest growing neighborhoods in Boulder County.

Named after a historic stagecoach route, Gunbarrel is often thought of as the little town that IBM built – however, the Boulder Country Club was first to lay claim on its rolling, grassy farmland. Nestled in the residential community of Gunbarrel Greens, the Boulder Country Club began construction of its golf course in 1962. The clubhouse, designed by Boulder’s own Hobart Wagener, was finished in 1965.

When IBM’s plant was built northeast of Boulder – also in 1965 – many executives and employees needed homes close to their new offices. After the initial development boom of the 1960s, Gunbarrel continued to quietly grow over the decades, housing businesses like Celestial Seasonings, Qualcomm, Coviden, Medtronic and ad agency behemoth Crispin Porter + Bogusky.

Deemed a Census Designated Place, Gunbarrel is technically located in unincorporated Boulder County, but shares utilities with the City of Boulder and school systems with neighbors Boulder and Niwot.

Alright, enough about its history and civic designations – let’s get down to what exactly makes Gunbarrel “Funbarrel”. For several decades, Gunbarrel’s retail options remained in the sufficient category – there was a grocery store, a few small restaurants, a gas station, a car wash and a satellite post office.

But with Boulder County’s continued housing boom, the offerings in Gunbarrel began to blossom around 2015. Avery Brewing moved its fancy, much-anticipated digs into the neighborhood, a major hotel built its “Boulder North” location (which holds the coveted Gold LEED Certified status), and infill developments began popping up around Gunbarrel’s retail center.

In addition to its growing retail and residential offerings, Gunbarrel has become ground zero for some of the area’s most innovative and award-winning microbreweries. While Avery’s flagship location sits at Gunbarrel’s brewery helm, there are plenty of other brewers who are well worth a sit-and-sip session: Finkel & Garf, New Planet, Asher, Vindication and Gunbarrel Brewing, who recently got a nod from the coveted Sunset Magazine. Nothing says “fun” like an afternoon of neighborhood brewery hopping, right?

To top off Gunbarrel’s engaging environs, the neighborhood is still considered a “bargain” for the area. A single-family home in Gunbarrel (but with a Boulder address) runs about thirty-three percent less than the same home in Boulder proper. For you number crunchers, the current Gunbarrel sold median is $635,000 versus Boulder’s $950,000.

For many, Gunbarrel’s retail offerings, trail systems, quiet neighborhoods and proximity to bustling Boulder provide the best of both worlds: living close to town without any of the associated headaches. And while some staunch Boulderites may still brush aside the neighborhood as “not Boulder,” the more Gunbarrel’s retail and residential offerings flourish and thrive, those naysayers won’t be brushing much longer.

By Sean McIllwain, Mod Boulder Real Estate. Sean McIllwain is the current president of Historic Boulder and the founding broker at Mod Boulder Real Estate. Call 720.252.6051, e-mail hello@modboulder.com or visit modboulder.com.

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http://athomecolorado.com/denver-most-recovered-city-since-great-recession/http://athomecolorado.com/denver-most-recovered-city-since-great-recession/#respondFri, 22 Dec 2017 21:45:10 +0000





http://athomecolorado.com/?p=13082
DENVER – Denver receives many ‘Best of’ acclaims and this is one top ranking the city can be especially proud of. The Mile High City ranked No. 1 for recovering more from the Great Recession than any U.S. city. The Great Recession had a huge impact on the national economy from 2007 to mid-2009. Investors […]

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Tom Kalinski, RE/MAX of Boulder

Tom Kalinski, RE/MAX of Boulder

DENVER – Denver receives many ‘Best of’ acclaims and this is one top ranking the city can be especially proud of. The Mile High City ranked No. 1 for recovering more from the Great Recession than any U.S. city.

The Great Recession had a huge impact on the national economy from 2007 to mid-2009. Investors suffered as the S&P Index fell 57 percent. Homeowners saw the housing market crash and home values dropped about 30 percent and unemployment reached about 10 percent nationally.

Now, in the near decade since, the economy has turned around in many cities – none more than Denver, according to a study by personal finance resource, SmartAsset. Study metrics measured multiple economic factors, including unemployment, income growth, and housing prices.

Denver gained big across almost every metric. Unemployment decreased from 11.9% in 2010 to just 4.3% in 2016. The poverty rate decreased 7.9% from 2010 to 2016, which was the largest decrease for any city in our study.

Denver most recovered city since Great Recession

The Mile High City ranked No. 1 for recovering more from the Great Recession than any U.S. city.

In home values, Denver has seen a 44.3 percent increase since the recession – the fifth-largest increase of metros analyzed. Household incomes also grew 35.57% – the sixth-highest.

California has also experienced big changes since 2009, with four of the top 10 most recovered cities in the state, where home values rose by at least 43 percent between 2010 and 2016, according to SmartAsset.

Five metrics were combined and each city’s average ranking across the metrics was calculated. Metrics include:

Change in unemployment rate. Data comes from the Census Bureau’s 1-Year 2010 and 1-Year 2016 American Community Survey.

Change in the labor participation rate. Data comes from the Census Bureau’s 1-Year 2010 and 1-Year 2016 American Community Survey.

Change in the poverty rate. Data comes from the Census Bureau’s 1-Year 2010 and 1-Year 2016 American Community Survey.

Change in median household income. Data comes from the Census Bureau’s 1-Year 2010 and 1-Year 2016 American Community Survey.

Change in median home value. Data comes from the Census Bureau’s 1-Year 2010 and 1-Year 2016 American Community Survey.

For the full study visit smartasset.com/mortgage/cities-that-have-recovered-most-since-the-recession.

By Tom Kalinski, RE/MAX of Boulder. Tom Kalinski is the Owner and Founder of RE/MAX of Boulder. Call 303.441.5620 or e-mail: tomkalinski33@gmail.com, boulderco.com.

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http://athomecolorado.com/steps-to-buying-a-home/http://athomecolorado.com/steps-to-buying-a-home/#respondFri, 22 Dec 2017 21:16:15 +0000







http://athomecolorado.com/?p=13077
NIWOT – If you’ve never bought a home or it has been a long, long time since you have done so, the process can seem overwhelming. What all needs to be done and when? Like any large task, the process can be broken down into manageable steps. Here are the basics: 1. Hire an excellent […]

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Karen Libin, KL Realty

Karen Libin, KL Realty

NIWOT – If you’ve never bought a home or it has been a long, long time since you have done so, the process can seem overwhelming. What all needs to be done and when? Like any large task, the process can be broken down into manageable steps. Here are the basics:

1. Hire an excellent Realtor
The first and perhaps most important step is to hire an experienced Realtor who can assist and guide you through the process. They will make sure your best interests are represented and that the transaction occurs smoothly. Their fee is paid through the seller, so you will incur no costs for their services.

2. Determine your budget
To calculate this, contact a mortgage. Through them, get a pre-qualification (for a loan) letter. Even better is a pre-approval letter. This makes you a more attractive potential buyer to sellers. This is especially important if you end up in a situation with multiple competing offers.

3. Choose a property type
City or country? Home or townhouse? Which neighborhoods? When determining what you want to buy, consider both short and long-term needs. Make a “wish list” but prioritize the most critical items as it’s likely that no one home will check all your boxes.

4. Find a property
After seeing potential properties, choose the home that best appeals to you and suites your needs. (Short sentence for a sometimes long process!)

5. The offer and counter-offers
Your Realtor will help determine the market value of your chosen property, review this with you to determine your offer price, and then will draft the offer contract. If needed, your Realtor will assist you through the counter-offer process as well.

6. Purchase contract and earnest money.
Once terms are agreed upon by both parties, the final contract is completed. At this point your earnest money is due.

7. Property inspection and resolution
The inspection is conducted to uncover problems or potential problems with the home. Sometimes other experts will need to be contacted for additional information or bids. Once the Inspection Report is completed, if needed, your Realtor will assist you in reaching an acceptable financial resolution with the seller.

8. The loan
The contract will specify a deadline the lender must furnish the buyer with a loan approval or declination. This step must be handled properly or you can risk losing your earnest money.

9. The survey
The lender or title company may require a property survey. Again, your Realtor will have contacts and can guide you through this step.

10. Homeowner’s insurance
While your loan commitment is being secured, you will need to purchase homeowner’s insurance before the loan can be finalized.

11. The closing and title transfer
Four days before the closing (the property purchase), a settlement statement will be available. At the closing you will bring a certified bank check unless a prior wire transfer has been made. After signing what feels like an unbelievable amount of documents, you will be finished and own your new home!

By Karen Libin, KL Realty. Karen is the owner and managing broker of KL Realty, and has more than 29 years of experience in the Boulder County real estate market. Contact Karen at KL Realty, call 303.444.3177, e-mail team@klrealty.net or visit klrealty.net.

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http://athomecolorado.com/real-estate-lease-option/http://athomecolorado.com/real-estate-lease-option/#respondFri, 22 Dec 2017 20:57:52 +0000







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  BOULDER – What is a lease option? Otherwise known as a “lease option to buy,” it is an agreement between a buyer and a property owner in which a buyer pays the owner money to purchase the property at a later date. c. However, there are many details that need to be worked out […]

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real estate lease option

A lease option is an agreement between a buyer and a property owner in which a buyer pays the owner money to purchase the property at a later date.

 

Duane Duggan, Realtor and Author, RE/MAX of Boulder

Duane Duggan, Realtor and Author, RE/MAX of Boulder

BOULDER – What is a lease option? Otherwise known as a “lease option to buy,” it is an agreement between a buyer and a property owner in which a buyer pays the owner money to purchase the property at a later date. c.

However, there are many details that need to be worked out to come to a satisfactory agreement. In Colorado, there is no Real Estate Commission-approved lease option form. Therefore, licensees would be practicing law to create such an agreement for clients. With that in mind, it is always a good idea to involve a real estate attorney to prepare the documents for the transaction.

The lease options I see are usually comprised of a lease that makes reference to the sales contract, and a sales contract that makes reference to the lease.

Items to negotiate within a lease option agreement:

– The rental amount per month.
– Any amount of the rent that would be applied to purchase. This could be $0, or it could be the full amount of the rent. Often it is a portion, such as 20%.
– Length of option. A year is fairly common.
– The cost of the option. The lower the amount, the less likely there will be a closing. Generally, a buyer wants to move forward with a lease option due to lack of money. Often the buyer can’t come up with an amount that will work for the seller.
– Is any part of the option refundable? Usually not. Otherwise why bother?
– Who holds the option money? The seller, title company, or real estate company.
– Is the property purchase price determined today? If today, will price be based on a current appraisal?
– Is the property purchase price determined in the future? Sometimes based on the average of two appraisals at a future date.
– Does the price go up as the time in the option moves forward?
– Who pays for utilities during the lease?
– Who pays for repairs that come up during the lease? For example, a broken water heater.
– Buyer loan qualifications. Many buyers want a lease option because they currently do not qualify for a loan. What is the likelihood they will be able to qualify by the time the option expires?

In a slow real estate market, sellers might have a stronger interest in lease options because they do not have another offer. In a hot market, sellers might have an interest in a lease option because they want to delay a closing until a later date. The bottom line is that there are circumstances where using a lease option can beneficial to both a seller and a buyer.

By Duane Duggan, Realtor and Author, RE/MAX of Boulder. Duane Duggan is an award-winner Realtor and author of the book, “Realtor for Life.” He has been a Realtor for RE/MAX of Boulder since 1982 and has facilitated over 2,500 transactions over his career. Living the life of a Realtor and being immersed in real estate led to the inception of his book. For questions, e-mail Duane at duaneduggan@boulderco.com, call 303.441.5611 or visit boulderco.com.

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